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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/26/2015 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    V70Rescue

    -2 reputation?

    I have no idea on how to find out. The only posts I have are this thread and probly 2 or 3 in 2015. Anything else is archived from what I can tell. I only ask questions, I'm no keyboard commando, I get along with everyone as far as I know but that -2 Poor Reputation is not fair without stating why. On other forums a persons feedback means whether your an honest guy that can be trusted to do business with. This I do not like and someone needs to prove I did something wrong or remove the negative remark.
  2. 3 points
    Fellow R enthusiasts, Installing new front struts (shock absorbers) is well within a competent DIY mechanic in the driveway. If you have the right tools, take your time, and follow common sense when compressing the suspension spring – this is a very rewarding repair. I highly recommend purchasing all the parts beforehand, including new nuts & bolts. If your spring seats or strut bearings are doubtful, replace them. You’ll want to avoid doing this again to replace a low cost part. Part recommendations Common consensus is to stick to Volvo genuine parts or better. Avoid cheap parts. Here’s an exploded diagram that will help with purchasing parts and re-assembly. Shock absorbers Item #13 - you have two options for the S60R/V70R: 1) purchase the Volvo part which costs about US$500-$600+ ea. - P/N 30683703 2) purchase the Monroe part approx. US$290 from RockAuto - P/N C2501 Monroe is the OEM supplier for Volvo. Both parts fit perfectly and have the correct connector lead and include a new top nut. Always replace shocks in pairs. Nuts & bolts Highly recommended that you purchase new nuts & bolt hardware. The nuts are self-locking which deform on tightening. If you look closely at the nut you’ll see the threaded section is slightly oval. Plus, they’re only a few bucks each. #4 - Strut bearing to suspension turret nuts (x6) - P/N 985868 (flange lock nut) #10 - Strut to steering knuckle nuts (x4) - P/N 982870 (flange screw) #11 - Strut to steering knuckle bolts (x4) - P/N 985660 (flange lock nut) Other parts if you need them #2 – Strut top washer (x2) - P/N 30647969 #3 – Cross nut (x2) - P/N 31262068 (fitting) #5 - Strut bearing (x2) - P/N 30714968 (support plate) #6 - Spring seat (x2) (use the ipd HD or Volvo XC90 spring seats) - P/N 112831 (ipd) - P/N 30683637 (Volvo XC90) #8 – Bump stop washer (x2) - P/N 31201386 (stop washer) #7 - Bump stop (x2) - P/N 30760914 (helper spring) #9 - Dust boot (x2) - P/N 30666850 (protection bellows) #14 – Plastic ABS sensor lead bracket - P/N 8646203 (bracket) Planning your work Seeing as the V70R suspension is similar to the 850 and Gen 1 cars, there are plenty of resources on the web: - Guide from Swedespeed with some pics - I followed the instructions in VIDA as they’re proven & work very well. You can download the PDF at the end of this post. Tools you will need Trolley jack & axle stands13, 18, 19, 21 & 22 mm ring spanners (box wrench) and/or socketsT40 Torx bitT50 Torx bit10mm socket & extension (1/4” drive is best)Vernier calipersGood quality spring compressorTorque wrench Tools to make life easier: Impact wrenchBreaker bar with 18 or 21 mm socketHammerPunch 6 mm (or 1/4")Punch 2 mm (or old drill bit)Small screw driverStringPliers with wire cutterOld wire coat hanger‘G’ clamp3 x 2” block of wood about 17” long Optional specialty tools: Set of Allen keys (hex keys) – metric or imperial, doesn't matterLoctite (always good practice)18, 21 & 22 mm crow foot wrench (allows correct torqueing of counter held nuts) Notes to VIDA instructions Differences in strut top nuts Factory fitted struts may use 21 mm SEMS nuts (combined nut & washer). Monroe OEM struts come with 22 mm lock nuts and separate washers. Having the right sized crowfoot wrench ensure you can correctly torque the top nut whilst counterholding the shock absorber shaft. The plastic covers for the strut top nuts will fit over the 22 mm nuts, but persuasion with a hammer is required. Levering the Lower Control Arm (LCA) If you have polyurethane LCA bushings fitted you may find it difficult to re-install the spring strut assembly. You’ll need to lever the control arm down, whilst attaching the steering knuckle, and re-inserting the bolts at the same time! Work instructions Preparation Chock the rear wheel, jack-up the front of the vehicle and support the front sub-frame on axle stands. Remove: :: the road wheel (19 mm socket) :: the anti-roll bar link from the spring strut (18 mm ring spanner & T40 Torx) Remove: :: the ABS sensor wire from the spring strut and move aside - be careful not to break the plastic clip, you’ll re-use this later :: the ABS sensor (10 mm socket) - hang up the sensor using a piece of wire :: the position sensor [accelerometer] from the spring strut - undo the bolt (10 mm socket) and move the position sensor aside Measuring camber Measure the spring strut position in relation to the wheel knuckle [spindle] before removal Note! The measurements are taken so that the same camber angle can be obtained when installing. See the illustration in the VIDA instruction PDF Tip: You can use the vernier calipers here - or - use a small Allen key to measure the inside gap between the strut and steering knuckle (like a feeler gauge). When re-assembling, slip the same size Allen key into gap to set the approximate camber. Removing the spring strut Remove: :: both the nuts from the screws in the spring strut - (18 & 21 mm ring spanner and/or sockets & breaker bar) :: the two bolts securing the spring strut to steering knuckle - (you’ll need a hammer & punch to tap out the bolt) Tip: Place a thick cloth over the CV boot to prevent damage in case the strut drops down onto the CV boot. Otherwise cut the bottom off a plastic soda bottle and cut the soda bottle lengthways so you can clip the soda bottle over the axle and CV boot for protection. Secure the wheel spindle with a piece of wire (coat hanger) so that it cannot turn outwards when removed from the spring strut. Otherwise you may damage the axle CV joints. Disconnect the 4C connector :: Loosen the 4C connector by the suspension turrets and the lead from the clips. :: Pull down the connector lead to the wheel housing. Tip: LH & RH 4C strut connector location (when facing the engine bay) - 3rd connector from the top - look for two wires, brown & black Use a small screwdriver to push in the retaining clip on the 4C connector. To facilitate re-assembly of the 4C strut wires: - tie a piece of string to the strut bar - tie the other end of the string to 4C strut connector you just removed - when the connector lead is unclipped and falls to the ground untie the string on the connector - use the string to pull the new connector lead to the top the engine bay Removing the strut bar does improve access to the connectors, but removal is not necessary. Remove: :: the nuts that hold the shock absorber bearing in the suspension turret x 3 pcs - (13 mm socket) :: the spring strut assembly from the vehicle Tip: Loosen, but leave 1 x nut closest to the fender attached to the strut bearing. This will stop the strut falling down awkwardly. When you’re ready to remove the strut assembly from the vehicle reach up and remove the last 13 mm nut. Carefully manoeuvre the strut assembly out of the wheel well, taking care to avoid the CV boot, brake hoses, and sensor wires. Ensure the steering knuckle doesn't flop around. Spring strut disassembly :: Pry off the plastic cap from the top of the spring strut assembly Removing the strut bearing Secure the spring strut in a vise (or lay the spring strut assembly down on a clear & flat surface. Remove: - the nut for the shock absorber bearing (21 mm ring spanner & T50 Torx) - the washer - the strut bearing Removing the spring - Attach your spring compressors Tip: Only use good quality spring compressors Make sure the spring compressors are spaced at 180 degrees from each other Ensure the spring compressor thread is well lubricated Tighten the spring compressors evenly Having an impact wrench saves time, but a ratchet will do the job You have compressed the spring enough when: - you can move the spring seat - the spring has lifted off the shock absorber Remove: - the cross shaped fixing nut on the shock absorber (T50 Torx as a counter hold and hammer will undo the cross nut) - the rubber spring seat - the spring - the rubber bump stop and dust boot (gaiter) Check that the strut bearing plate, the spring seat, the rubber bump stop with boot are undamaged. Replace if necessary. Spring strut re-assembly Remove the ABS sensor cable clip from the old shock absorber. - note the ABS sensor cable clip is secured by 2 x expanding plastic rivets (image from Howards Volvo site) - carefully punch out the plastic center pins using the 2 mm punch - retain both plastic center pins - remove the cable clip from the old shock absorber and transfer to the new one - insert the plastic center pins and tap in until they are flush Tip: If you break the expanding plastic rivets, you can use pop rivets to fix the cable clip to the new strut Installing the spring Compress the new spring to a length of approx. 260 mm (if you've compressed the spring sufficiently for disassembly – you should be OK) Install: - the bump stop with the boot - the spring - the upper spring seat - the fixing nut [cross nut] - tighten the cross nut to 70 Nm (52 ft.lbs) Tip: Make sure the spring is seated correctly in the shock absorber and upper spring seat If you don’t have the special cross nut socket (e.g. ipd version) - apply Loctite to the cross nut - use the Torx T50 as a counter hold - tighten the nut securely using either; a small ring spanner, channel locks pipe wrench or even a few ‘love taps’ with a hammer If you have installed spring seat correctly and torqued the cross nut properly you won’t have to re-tighten the cross nut later on Installing the shock absorber bearing Install: - the strut bearing [support plate] - the washer - the top nut and tighten to 70 Nm (52 ft.lbs) Tip: To ensure the right torque, use a 22 mm crowfoot spanner on your torque wrench and Torx T50 as a counter hold Otherwise tighten with a 22 mm ring spanner and Torx T50 Re-installing the spring strut - Fit the spring strut in the suspension turret with new nuts x 3 pcs - Tighten to 25 Nm (19 ft.lbs) - Pull up the shock absorber’s connector lead in the engine compartment and plug in the connector by the suspension turret. (this is where the string comes in handy) Fit the 4C connector lead in the clips Install the spring strut on the stub axle. Use new bolts and new nuts. Tip: When re-installing the strut assembly, it’s easier to install, but don’t fully tighten, the 3 x nuts in the suspension turret – as this allows some wriggle room when installing the steering knuckle bolts. If you have polyurethane LCA bushings fitted (especially the rear LCA bushings) you may require extra force to lever the control arm down to make room for the strut. This can be challenging with one person. To make life easier: - Protect the CV boot with a thick cloth or plastic soda bottle - Using the G clamp, fix the piece of wood to the control arm as shown below - You can then use your foot to force the control arm down whilst connecting the steering knuckle to the strut - Jiggle the control arm and strut whilst inserting the bolts Adjust the spring strut and stub axle to the measured value. Note! Ensure that measurement is performed at same points as when removing. Tip: Tighten the strut bolts snugly, but do not fully tighten Use vernier callipers to check the measurement, or use the Allen key method Tighten the screws to 105 Nm (75 ft.lbs) and further angle tighten 60 degrees Final re-installation Install: :: the position sensor - the bolt for the position sensor (10mm socket) - tighten to 24 Nm (18 ft.lbs) :: the anti-roll bar link to the spring strut - re-install the nut (18mm ring spanner & T40 Torx) - tighten to 50 Nm (37 ft.lbs) :: the ABS sensor - re-install the bolt (10mm socket) - tighten the ABS sensor bolt to 24 Nm (18 ft.lbs) Note! Ensure that the ABS sensor seat in the stub axle is absolutely clean. :: the road wheel - re-install the lug nuts (19 mm socket) - tighten to 140 Nm (103 ft.lbs) Lower the car to the ground and perform a SUM calibration. Also get a wheel alignment after SUM calibration. That’s it! If I can do it, so can you. Cheers, Trent Front Strut.pdf
  3. 3 points
    NChoy

    P80 AWD Rear Suspension Bushings

    Here's some pics of the installed custom upper control arm bushings. I had three sets made, one for me, the other two for Will and Hussein. When all this is said and done we will be the only 3 V70Rs in the world with this type of system. Specs: the bushings are milled using UHMW, which is a harder compound than Delrin. The sleeves are hardened steel. Here's a few pics... All four: DSC_1251 by Nick Choy, on Flickr Upper control arm bushing #1: DSC_1253 by Nick Choy, on Flickr Upper control arm bushing #2: DSC_1255 by Nick Choy, on Flickr #1 installed (this one went in easy!): DSC_0208 by Nick Choy, on Flickr #2 installed (this one was a real PITA!): DSC_0209 by Nick Choy, on Flickr Had to make this little guy in order to help "seat" bushing #2: DSC_0204 by Nick Choy, on Flickr Here's the process, using sockets as spacers: DSC_0200 by Nick Choy, on Flickr
  4. 2 points
    NChoy

    P80 AWD Rear Suspension Bushings

    Hey Will... remember those mystery upper LCA bushings that we couldn't find in poly? Well, look what I found! You can get them here: http://www.retroturbo.com/?product=760-960-series-multilink-mk1-pu-bushings-rear-suspension-prt
  5. 2 points
    Well my son's S40 made it through emission testing today, woo hoo!
  6. 2 points
    flyfishing3

    1998 V70R Mechanics Special $300 obo

    Told you I alerted the right people.
  7. 2 points
    33647_1450202331

    S/V40 Sway Bars

    Riding on KWs be like
  8. 2 points
    NEU

    What did you do your X40 today?

    All the p80's have the cooling duct, not just ME7 cars. And if you are using your original TCV I'd maybe get another or go for the upgrade. The OEM TCV is good new but they fail fast. They are cheap enough to not worry about breaking the back IIRC $30? Or upgrade to something that can take more abuse like the HD TCV on the Porsche or Delco or MAC valves (IPD, SNAAB, etc...) Delcos are cheap ($40) and last for a good long while, mines been running good for the past 8yrs, you just have to get a Delco plug and Bosch plug to make an adaptor
  9. 2 points
    33647_1450202331

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Been doing some serious "tweaking" on the s40 took down an LS Camaro with mods earlier this morning
  10. 2 points
    33647_1450202331

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Threw a tree on it
  11. 2 points
    Phixion

    2001 V40 1.9T Buying information

    I can't speak for the wagon, but when I had my 2001 S40 sedan, I got up to 31.5mpg on long distance trips. Most of the time I was around 26-27mpg on a daily 45 mile one-way commute. One thing to bear in mind is that many of us on here probably hop up the car to some degree, which means we're seeking performance and thus mileage will decrease naturally as the throttle is pressed harder. But for normal driving, the high 20s is very possible.
  12. 2 points
    MattyXXL

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    I going to send chuck a server 2012 for dummies book for Christmas.
  13. 2 points
    crusty old and ornery

    Downpipe revisited

    Downpipe build revisited In the spring of 2006, jgray posted a "How To" to build a 3" stainless downpipe. Having built two of these now, I would like to repost and update this how to. Please read through all of this before ordering parts or commencing work. I have attached jgrays' original write up to this post, as I have drawn heavily from it and as the innovator and father of this, he deserves much credit. More pictures are coming. I wanted to get this up. Here is a list of parts that I used to build this exhaust system. I added to the downpipe from the original post, to include the balance of the exhaust. The 4" long 3" diameter flex coupler is the interlocking type and this time I purchased this from Verocious. The first time I bought it off fleabay and it was the interlocking type. I did not find any of this style flex coupler there this time, but if you are patient, you might. I wasn't and Verocious filled the need. I do not include a part number for: The CAT. The original cat shown in jgrays writeup is a bullet design . There are members in this forum who will tell you that the $50 cats from fleabay won't last a year. I've seen them last 2, and was replaced not because it failed, but becase the downpipe was replaced. Your mileage may vary. Flange. There is no way around it. This one must be manufactured. I have not found one prefab to fit our TD04 turbo. Ideally, the flange will not only fit the turbo outer dimensions, but will be counter bored to form a gas seal on the turbo side, and counter bored to fit the 3" mandrel bend on the pipe side. The flange dimensions are posted, but the counter bore dimensions are not listed. Discuss this with your machinist. Stainless V-band clamp – 2.5” Many on the market. Let your conscious or wallet be your guide. For this write up, the CAT is flanged and bolted.. You may wish to weld the CAT directly on. This solution as is adds expense and a pair of joints that can leak, but worth it should you need to change a CAT. A simpler solution is to just weld it on. Your downpipe, your option. A few words of warning. I have visited the service departments at two dealerships with this downpipe installed. They had a fit. With the bullet cat installed, they immediately, without inspection or reservation, declare that the exhaust has to go, there is no cat, it is illegal..... Here in the US, the law says that there must be a catylitic converter installed. In some areas, they perform a sniffer test to ensure that your car is not contaminating the environment with undesired gasses and of course in California, your CAT must have a CARB number or you can just forget it. The S40 is OBDII which means that the CAT MUST be OBDII compliant. If your aim is to simply build the downpipe, I have included the original parts list as well. If you are going racing and the vehicle is for competition only, (and not to be driven on the street) then disregard the CAT info and drive on. I will not post the EPA regulation here. It is easy to find. Do a google search for it and read it, you'll be glad you did. As long your car passes emissions testing and you have not altered the function of the exhaust (removed the emissions controls) you can tell the dealer to stuff it. Well,..... tactfully...... Lastly a word about safety. I will state what should be obvious to everyone, but for the record.... When working under a vehicle on a project such as this, the vehicle should be well supported on a lift or jack stands, never solely on a hydraulic jack and absolutely never on a scissors jack (which are good for changing a tire on the side of the road - sometimes). Block the tires that remain on the ground and don't work on a hot exhaust system to avoid burning yourself. Downpipe design: This is a fairly straight forward design. Once upon a time anti-reversion tubes were the rage. The performance gain here is debatable. I have done no research on this and will not likely do so in the future. If you have the motivation to do so, please add your input after you have installed one - with before and after dyno results. Construction: 304 stainless is used throughout, save for the bung plug. In my humble opinion, TIG welding is the only option on stainless, but that is only my opinion. All pieces should be tack welded together prior to final welding to ensure correct fit. Now, on to the meat of the matter! With the vehicle raised and supported, you will want to remove the stock exhaust system. Chiefly this is done by removing the heat shield at the rear of the engine over the exhaust manifold, removing the turkey pan, removing the two oxygen sensors, and then removing the three nuts at the turbo that hold the OEM CAT in place. After that, separate it from the other half of the exhaust and then the exhaust hangers underneath the vehicle. The order of operations here is optional. You may want to remove the heat shield, turkey pan, O2 sensors and loosen the turbo nuts with the vehicle on the ground to save your back and then raise the car to do the underneath work. Now, fit up the flange at the turbo and place the upper 90 degree elbow (90 degree pipe, no leg) and mark its' position on the flange and the pipe. Mark the position of the turbo studs on the pipe. The stock installation nuts will not quite fit here now. You have two options. Find smaller nuts of the correct thread pitch or custom dent the the 90 degree elbow to clear the nuts. You'll have to work this out for yourself. I dented mine preweld. Next take a moment to locate where you want to install the two upper bungs - one for O2 sensor #1, and one for a wideband or for future use. This second upper bung is optional and if installed, is plugged when not in use. Drill out the holes for the upper bungs, weld in the bungs and then weld the upper 90 degree pipe to the flange. Weld on the 4" flex coupler Cut the 90 degree pipe (short leg) to fit. This is the height adjustment to get the pipe up out of the way - ground clearance - but still keep it away from the chassis. On my first downpipe, I did not cut this at all and occasionally I would scrape the pipe on bumps and obstructions. This time I chose to cut away 2". If you choose to cut it, do so carefully so as to maintain square. A short piece of 3" straight tubing cut from the two foot stock - roughly 4 3/8" long. This is to clear the chassis before arching up and over with the two 45 degree pieces. Your dimension may differ here. 45 degree no leg. 45 degree no leg - These two 45 degree bends get you lined up with the stock exhaust. The stainless exhaust hanger goes here. You will need to line this up and tack weld by eye. 3” stainless pipe Flanged CAT assembly This is the cat with a short piece of 3" tube welded on the downstream end 3" piping The bung for the second O2 sensor is welded here. Use the O2 sensor extension cable here. This is the most dealer/emissions tester/ECM module friendly option, but adds the expense of the extender cable, the trouble of routing it and installation considerations on how to mount it so it won't get damaged. Summit racing offers 24 and 36 inch extension cables. Volvo offers a 10" in extension and the prices are all competitive (shock!) or rather, Summits 36" extension cable and Volvos 10" extension cable are roughly the same price. 10” will work fine. Reducer to 2.5" 2.5" tubing to vband clamp Stock 2.5” exhaust. I picked up a stock center muffler exhaust piece (which extends over the right rear control arm to connect to the (HORRORS!!) stock muffler with a new gasket. I cut this piece short to eliminate the center muffler and allow for extended 3” stainless after the CAT. How-To BUILD A .pdf
  14. 2 points
    survolvo

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    It might come back, but will never recover. VS as we know it, is a thing of the past. As with everything else, I am angry and bitter™ about that. He is vomiting and squirting diarrhea all over the place while working out in the gym so he can look tough while revving his engine at people.
  15. 2 points
    xcites40

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    Not sure what Timmy (timbo slice) would do since vs is dead and chipotle is serving E-coli http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2015/10/e_coli_sickens_at_least_22_peo.html#incart_breaking
  16. 2 points
    xcites40

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    Chuck is probally doing inventory of his firearm and accidently shoot into the server rack.
  17. 2 points
    mattb

    RHD HEADLIGHT

    Group texts are still an issue, it's just now starting to get back to normal. Valerian: the forum is mostly US based users, with some Aussies and Brits as well. Je suis Francais, aux US. Je contacte un ami Américain qui habite en Allemagne et je t'envois ca. Il a un contact en Suede qu'il utilise pour acheter des boites de vitesse et autres pieces rares. Mike, I was thinking that Big Will may be able to help with his wrecker connection in Sweden. He's in Berlin now but should have the guy's contact info.
  18. 2 points
    NChoy

    P80 AWD Rear Suspension Bushings

    Parts all painted up nice, to match the red on the engine block... DSC_0585 Rear hubs all painted up with new bushings... DSC_0588 Control arms, driveline, hubs installed... DSC_0592 New toe bars (thanks JC!) DSC_0595 Yes, that's a P2 angle gear vent and filter: DSC_0597 Toe bars installed: DSC_0600 Entire subframe assembly together, waiting to go in: DSC_0634 Another angle: DSC_0636
  19. 2 points
    NChoy

    Let the games begin...

    Rear suspension bits are back from the powdercoating shop. Time to start installing bushings! DSC_0347 Let's start with this one! Notice how I have to use all kinds of large sockets to get them to go in. (that's a head bolt by the way)... DSC_0348 Set of custom bushings made by my machinist. All other bushings are off-shelf poly for 240 and 740 applications, believe it or not! DSC_1251 Installed: DSC_0208 Had to use this specially made tool to install the smaller bushings: DSC_0204 Like so: DSC_0200
  20. 2 points
    Big Will

    P80 AWD Rear Suspension Bushings

    Little update: My spare rear suspension parts went from this: To this: Most of the parts were powder-coated black. I primered and painted the rear axles with a Rustoleum cast-iron color engine enamel. You'll see one side of one is already painted black as it was brand new whereas the other needed a little glass bead blasting. The toe bars I did in a BMW Mystic Blue Metallic as I had a rattle can of that leftover. I have all of the bushings and an extra set of rear spindles that are clean and painted. At some point I'll have enough time to actually install this stuff.
  21. 1 point
    glm409

    How to remove airbox to service MAF sensor

    It is T25. I bought this set from Amazon https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01IUCONNY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 GLM
  22. 1 point
    glm409

    How to remove airbox to service MAF sensor

    Use a security Torx bit to remove the two torx screws holding the MAF unit and spray that with the CRC cleaner (That's what I do). Much easier than pulling everything apart. GLM
  23. 1 point
    flyfishing3

    Looking for help

    manual or auto? make sure the AWD is working. what interior?
  24. 1 point
    33647_1450202331

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Nvm you're all dead to me
  25. 1 point
    TEEKAY

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Found a ratchet / socket combo that fit just right for the front sway bar bushings. Got one in easy, the other was seized or in there real good. I'll have to revisit it with one of those fancy sockets for rounded bolt heads.
  26. 1 point
    flyfishing3

    04 V70R probably totaled

    pegs are always easy to sell if in good condition, sub woofer if you have on. third row is always bank seat skins if in good shape. esp. the driver side. HU has value. than motor etc.
  27. 1 point
    V70Rescue

    -2 reputation?

    If this is something derogatory I think I deserve to know why
  28. 1 point
    flyfishing3

    What did you do your X40 today?

    You going to Carlisle? There might be somebody attending that has lots of the blue.
  29. 1 point
    1clean00

    What did you do your X40 today?

    It definitely requires less pedal, but still not where i want them to be. This is only because the brakes at this point are physically worn and the calipers are working a little harder than they should need to provide full clamping force. I'm hoping that with the new rotors and pads it's even better. Best $ spent on the job was the one man bleed hose from Napa. Bled the brakes probably three times to clear out all the old fluid and it worked like a champ.
  30. 1 point
    Phixion

    BBS Crater Wheels 16x7

    Maybe because there's lots of S40's in CA, but I see Craters quite often. I tend recall that I see them more often on the V40's??
  31. 1 point
    33647_1450202331

    BBS Crater Wheels 16x7

    Sell ya mine, I'm in NY
  32. 1 point
  33. 1 point
    flyfishing3

    2000 s40 upgrades?

    Kristian is the man. Totally a stand up guy and he owns snabb
  34. 1 point
    xcites40

    2004 V40 1.9T U.S Fuel Tank Capacity

    chicken..I put close to 14 gallons on it before. I'm lazy so i keep driving. I average around 13.5 gallons when I fill up.
  35. 1 point
    33647_1450202331

    What did you do your X40 today?

    I told you it couldn't be done without one, wtf did you try to do it with? and if you say a hammer I'll slap you at Carlisle
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    mans442

    New Purchase

    Photos finally... http://i.imgur.com/QKYIaKQ.jpg
  38. 1 point
    xcites40

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    I'm sure there are a few who have some website experience/ knowledge willing to lend a hands in supporting the website forum if he willing to allow that. It is tough for members that have paid membership to endure severe usability within the recent years. This is a new low if we exceed turbobrick downtime
  39. 1 point
    mattb

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    Love the trademark, that's gold!
  40. 1 point
    TEEKAY

    The Volvospeed is dead thread

    This reminded me of the scene in lord of the rings when galadriel is shaming elrond for not helping men.
  41. 1 point
    mattb

    Odd Misfire Problem

    Sucks to see this. I think your asking price is high. Given the work required on the car, and assuming it's a car that doesn't have new tires, new brakes, etc.... I think it's worth around $800-$1,000. Hopefully you get more, it's such a great color!
  42. 1 point
    NEU

    ARD Lightweight Pulley?

    This pulley is for the serpentine belt, not the timing belt, you don't have to mark anything. Just remove the serp belt, hit the bolts with an impact, remove the pulley, and install. You need to torque the bolts and install the belt and it's done....
  43. 1 point
    Diio

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Did change clutch, flexplate, slave cylinder and sealing ring on the block also did it alone :/
  44. 1 point
    1clean00

    BOV

    The s/v40 has a compressor bypass valve that recirculates the excess pressure back into the intake. On an automatic car a blow off valve is unnecessary. You'd be better off going with a higher duty CBV, like Forge or Kinugawa...http://shopping.kinugawaturbo.com/kinugawabilletadjustablemitsubishiturboblowoffvalvebovvolvosrt-4gm.aspx
  45. 1 point
    alschnertz

    Oil pressure warning light?

    The Merritt Parkway is far from canyon twisting. Though it's a 4-lane limited access highway, it's often so crowded that just maintaining 55 mph is difficult.
  46. 1 point
    Carlos

    Random interior parts

    Okay it's been forever. I'm super busy. Sorry everyone. Here's pictures of what I have ready to ship RIGHT NOW. 25$ takes all of this right now. I have more stuff in storage but I am too busy to get to it. If no one takes this in a week it goes to the garbage. If it's not in the picture don't ask for it I haven't gotten to it yet or it's in storage (or it got thrown away!).
  47. 1 point
    Karl

    turbo options

    Unless you have unlimited time, patience and a DIY attitude don't do it. Like the guys say it's all been done with some success and a lot of fails. If you think you're just going to bolt on a few things and get a $400 tune and come out > 300hp you'll be mistaken. But hey, who am I .......
  48. 1 point
    those FPS Fuel Pressure sensors should be replaced every 100K kms. I hope they are making better ones now. I was getting very unnerving "flat spots" on the highway, and was also getting gaps coming off first gear (6 spd) when just starting out. I googled diagnosed it as the FPS, brought it too a shop, they found a DTC high fuel rail pressure, but not active. Replaced the part, new plugs too, and she runs great, including no more drop after first - second shift. I couldn't wait need the car so had to fork over $250 for the part + labor etc.
  49. 1 point
    1clean00

    What did you do your X40 today?

    Changed the oil on the S60 and the V40. Fixed the brake servo hose with the plug kit that Phixion posted. Worked perfectly, ran into trouble getting out the old o-ring, it was so brittle it crumbled, so i pulled the throttle body, cleaned it, and reinstalled using the SNABB throttle spacer. Took the car for a spin, and then when i got back popped the hood and noticed a partly shredded serp belt, also the tensioner was really noisy. Replaced with a new Dayco quiet drive belt from advance, $22. Had a good used tensioner from the S60 so that went on as well. A few beers later, and since i already had the car on jack stands, pulled the passenger cv and replaced it with an FEQ unit from Worldpac. R&R on the CV was easy, the only setback was the tie-rod bolt head was a bit stripped so i had to run out to Autozone at 9pm and pickup a tap and die set. Pulled the tie-rod and re-threaded it and the nut and it went back together smoothly. Car feels like new now and idles super quiet. All in all got a lot done. Almost got into mounting my wagon roof spoiler but my drill was out of juice so it'll have to wait. Also changed the oil in my lawnmower and seafoamed that oh yeah!, holy smoke!
  50. 1 point
    NChoy

    Let the games begin...

    Here's the pics: (All aluminum work done by Mac's Radiator on SE Foster... special thanks to Mike and Ellie for their hard work) Custom all-aluminum radiator... Closer shot of some detail (this is the OEM core, with aluminum end tanks. All mounting points are exactly like OEM... Modified the top port on the intercooler. Moved to OEM location (more toward center), and opened up to 2.5"... I have to take it back on Tuesday because they didn't make the port 3" long like I asked them to... it's only 1.5" long. DAMMIT!!! Modified 740 Turbo oil cooler... Close up of welded bungs... This cooler will mount between the a/c condenser and the bumper support. Here it is placed for fitment before swapping the bungs... Using Russell AN fittings and Aeroquip high-pressure hydraulic hose, tied into welded bungs on the OEM oil cooler hard lines, like so... Here's a rough idea of where the Greddy 50mm BOV mounts... it may change ever so slightly in orientation and location, but you get the idea: More later!